The Rise of Women in Cannabis 2018: Females In Front

The Rise of Women in Cannabis 2018: Females In Front

According to Marijuana Business Daily, women make up approximately 27% of C-Suite level positions in the cannabis industry, which doesn’t sound like much until you realize that the national average is only 23%. What is unsettling, is that in 2015 women held 36% of executive control. That is almost a 10% loss of leadership positioning in less than 3 years.

12 Minority-Owned Cannabis Businesses That Are Shaping the Industry

12 Minority-Owned Cannabis Businesses That Are Shaping the Industry

In the fight to end the war on drugs, one fact of cannabis prohibition has been prominent throughout history: that people of color are disproportionately affected by cannabis-related arrests and convictions. Although white and black Americans use cannabis at equal rates, people of color are four times more likely to be arrested for cannabis possession. Even in states where cannabis is legal, people of color are still twice as likely to face a cannabis charge.

Meet the Supernova Women, Trailblazers for Equity in the Cannabis Industry

Meet the Supernova Women, Trailblazers for Equity in the Cannabis Industry

Although diverse communities in cannabis are growing, for black and brown women, the old adage rings true: “All the women are white, all the blacks are men, but some of us are brave.” Supernova Women is turning that reality on its head. Founded in 2015 by three black and one multiracial woman, the Oakland, Calif.-based organization creates gateways of equity in the weed industry by offering women of color empowerment through community education and advocacy.

Inclusive Weed Entrepreneurs: Supernova Women

Inclusive Weed Entrepreneurs: Supernova Women

The War on Drugs fueled the modern-day prison industrial complex for decades, and many politicians now agree that it was a misguided federal policy that resulted in the needless incarceration of millions of Americans — particularly Black and Latino folks. From 1990 to 2010, the amount of people in state prisons for drug offenses increased by 52 percent according to the American Civil Liberties Union. These arrests for non-violent crimes tore apart communities of color nationwide, separating families and saddling the loved ones of incarcerated individuals with financial burdens — from legal costs to drastic reductions to their household incomes.